22%


The percentage of women in the 32nd Dáil will hit a record high according to the Director of Operations and Campaigns for Women for Election, Suzanne Collins as 35 women were elected in GE16. Speaking about the result, Suzanne Collins said,

“The general election in 2011 saw 25 women elected. They were joined by two additional women, Ruth Coppinger and Helen McEntee following by-elections. Which meant that the outgoing Dáil had a record high of 27 women making up 16% of the TDs.

“Thirty-five women in the 32nd Dáil will mean that 22% or one in five TDs are female.

“The result is even more remarkable given the fact that the Dáil has reduced its seats from 166 to 158 and a number of incumbent female TDs lost their seats including, Fine Gael’s Áine Collins, Gabrielle McFadden and Michelle Mulherin; the Labour Party’s Anne Ferris, Ann Phelan, Kathleen Lynch, Joanna Tuffy and Ciara Conway; and RENUA Ireland’s Lucinda Creighton. Of these nine women, five lost their seats to a male candidate. Two other women, Fine Gael’s Olivia Mitchell and Sinn Féin’s Sandra McLellan opted not to contest the election.

“This election also saw the 100th woman elected to the Dáil, Fine Gael’s Maria Bailey who won a seat in Dun Laoghaire.

“Just over 26% of first preference votes were cast for women with a high in Dún Laoghaire of 61%. In fact, 19 of 40 constituencies gave women over 30% of their first preferences. In GE2011, voters cast 15% of first preference votes for the 15% of female candidates.

“This is an incredible result for women nationally in GE16. The gender quota for selection was successful in getting them on the ticket and the voters were successful in getting them elected.

“Women for Election campaigned urging voters to find the women who best represented their politics, policies, views and values and give them the highest possible preferences. It would seem that the electorate did just that and we have seen the incredible difference it has made. Women for Election trained and mentored many women for this election and we were delighted to see that 40% of those newly elected women have come through our core training programmes.

“There was a huge interest in how women were doing in this campaign. Women for Election acted as a cheer squad for women on-line and our Twitter account had close to half a million impressions over the last month as people engaged with news and updates and results of the election.

“The success of women in this election nationally is only an indication of the potential of the positive change that can still happen. It is interesting that of the 18 newly elected female TDs, 16 of them are sitting councillors and two are Senators. This reinforces Women for Election’s call for a gender quota for selection at local government level. It is essential to create a pipeline into politics and create a pool of strong viable candidates who can successfully contest national elections. One positive knock-on effect of the gender quotas for selection saw a doubling of women running as independents and in smaller groupings. It is likely that this could be replicated at local level.

“GE16 was an important first step in attempting to create a gender balance in Dáil Éireann. It is vital that women who were elected get the support and training they require to flourish because they will act as an encouragement to other women in around the country to step forward or stay in political life. Women for Election are excited about playing our part.”

ENDS

Notes:

26% of first preference votes were cast for women (over half a million votes – 533,092)

61% of first preference votes were cast for women in Dún Laoghaire (highest)

100th woman elected to the Éireann (Maria Bailey Dún Laoghaire)

18 of 35 women TDs will represent Dublin constituencies

3 constituencies elected women for the first time:
Louth (Imelda Munster SF)
Kildare South (Fiona O’Loughlin FF)
Cork South West (Margaret Murphy O’Mahony)

Cavan also elected its first woman (Niamh Smyth FF) although two women have represented the constituency of Cavan/Monaghan both Margaret Conlon (FF) and Heather Humphreys are from Monaghan.

List of female members of the 32nd Dáil

Carlow Kilkenny
Kathleen Funchion Sinn Féin

Cavan Monaghan
Heather Humphreys Fine Gael
Niamh Smyth Fianna Fáil

Cork South West
Margaret Murphy O’Mahony Fianna Fáil

Dublin Central
Mary Lou McDonald Sinn Féin
Maureen O’Sullivan Independent

Dublin Bay North
Denise Mitchell Sinn Féin

Dublin Bay South
Kate O’Connell Fine Gael

Dublin Fingal
Clare Daly Independents4change
Louise O’Reilly Sinn Féin

Dublin Mid-West
Frances Fitzgerald Fine Gael

Dublin South West
Katherine Zappone Independent

Dublin North West
Roisin Shortall Social Democrats

Dublin Rathdown
Josepha Madigan Fine Gael
Catherine Martin Green Party

Dublin South Central
Joan Collins Independents4change
Catherine Byrne Fine Gael
Brid Smith AAA-PBP

Dublin West
Joan Burton Labour
Ruth Coppinger AAA-PBP

Dun Laoghaire
Mary Mitchell O’Connor Fine Gael
Maria Bailey Fine Gael

Galway East
Anne Rabbitte Fianna Fáil

Galway West
Catherine Connolly Independent
Hildegarde Naughton Fine Gael

Kildare North
Catherine Murphy Social Democrats

Kildare South
Fiona O’Loughlin Fianna Fáil

Limerick City
Jan O’Sullivan Labour

Louth
Imelda Munster Sinn Féin

Mayo
Lisa Chambers Fianna Fáil

Meath East
Helen McEntee Fine Gael
Regina Doherty Fine Gael

Offaly
Carol Nolan Sinn Féin
Marcella Corcoran Kennedy Fine Gael

Waterford
Mary Butler Fianna Fáil

Latest Tweets

The 2012 Electoral Amendment Act requires that each sex makes up at least 30% of a party's candidates.

Below is the effect of gender quotas on the 2016 General Election compared to the 2011 figures.

Thanks to @OireachtasNews for the great visuals #OireachtasLibrary

Interesting read on attempts to tackle sexism in Australian politics... We must challenge the gendered systems that have created barriers for women attempting to enter politics #MoreWomen

A fascinating interview with @MonicaBelfast, one of the two women who were involved in the Peace Talks in Northern Ireland. She describes about how she fought for her seat at the negotiating table. #MoreWomen

A visual representation of the lack of diversity in world politics today- Despite making up over 50% of the population of Ireland, only 22% of TDs are women. We can not be an inclusive Ireland if all are not included #MoreWomen

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